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Kagya
Amoako
Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Tagliatela College of Engineering
Mechanical/Civil & Environmental Engineering
203-479-4877
Camp 201
Camp
Biography

    Dr. Kagya Amoako joined the Department of Mechanical, Civil, and Environmental Engineering as an Assistant Professor in Fall 2014. He joined the university because it provided the opportunity to teach and conduct research that address cardiovascular diseases through medical device development. It also provided the unique opportunity to help develop a master’s level biomedical engineering program at the Tagliatela College of Engineering.

    Dr. Amoako’s background and research activities are in the areas of biomaterials in medicine. These materials are increasingly being used in ways that warrant their interaction with cells, bacteria, blood, tissue, and sometimes a combination of these complex living systems. The fates of such interactions are critical in biomimetic surfaces, regenerative medicine, immunomodulation, smart biomaterials for drug delivery applications and many more. For blood-contacting devices, their surface interactions with blood mostly lead to blood coagulation, inflammation, device failure, and patient complications. Their lifetime is limited to hours and days due to clot formation. Use on the order of months is however needed for many of these devices including vascular grafts, catheters, artificial lungs, extracorporeal circulation circuits, and dialysis membranes, which rely on the free flow of blood over their surfaces.  The ideal approach to this problem is one that prevents clot formation only at the interacting surface and without systemic effects. His research interests have focused on bio-inspired polymer surface and bulk modification to incorporate anti-clotting functions of the endothelium on biomaterials.

    He received his B.S. in Physics and Mathematics from Delaware State University in 2004. He then earned his M.S.E. in Mechanical Engineering and a Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering from The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, in 2006 and 2011 respectively. His doctoral work focused on “anti-platelet” nitric oxide therapies to inhibit blood coagulation on blood contacting medical devices.

    Before Dr. Kagya Amoako joined the University of New Haven, he was supported by a NIH T32 postdoctoral fellowship and worked on “anti-fouling” surface coatings at the University of Washington, Seattle, and the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

    Dr. Amoako enjoys cooking, the outdoors, playing soccer, tennis, and biking.

     


Academic Credentials

    EDUCATION

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Biomaterials, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor MI, and University of Washington, Seattle WA

    Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor MI

    M.S.E in Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor MI

    B.S. in Physics and Mathematics, Delaware State University, Dover DE

    SELECTED PEER REVIEWED PUBLICATIONS

    1. Surbhi Gupta, KAAmoako, Ahmed Suhaib, Keith E. Cook. Multi-modal, surface focused anticoag- ulation using poly-2-methoxyethylacrylate polymer grafts and surface nitric oxide release. Advanced Material Interfaces. 2014, doi: 10.1002/admi.201400012
    2. Harihara Sandaram, Xia Han, Ann K. Nowinski, Norman D. Brault, Yuting Li, Jean-Rene Ella- Menye, KAAmoako, Keith E. Cook, Patrick Marek, Kris Senecal, and Shaoyi Jiang. Achieving One-step Surface Coating of Highly Hydrophilic Poly(Carboxybetaine Methacrylate) Polymers on Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Surfaces. Advanced Materials Interfaces. 2014, doi: 10.1002/admi.201400071
    3. Hitesh Handa, Elizabeth J. Brisbois, Terry C. Major, Lahdan Refahiyat, KAAmoako, Robert H. Bartlett and Mark E. Meyerhof. Hemocompatibility comparison of biomedical grade polymers using rabbit thrombogenicity model for preparing nonthrombogenic nitric oxide releasing surfaces. Journal of materials chemistry. B, Materials for biology and medicine. 2014, 2(8): 1059-1067
    4. Hitesh Handa, Elizabeth J. Brisbois, Terry C. Major, Lahdan Refahiyat, KAAmoako, Gail M. Annich, Robert H. Bartlett and Mark E. Meyerhof. In vitro and in vivo study of sustained nitric oxide release coating using diazeniumdiolate-doped poly(vinyl chloride) matrix with poly(lactide- co-glycolide) additive. Journal of materials chemistry. B, Materials for biology and medicine. 2013,1(29): 3578-3587
    5. KA Amoako, Montoya JP, Major TC, Meyerhof ME, Bartlett RH, Cook KE. Fabrication and In vivo Thrombogenecity Testing of Nitric Oxide Generating Artificial Lungs. J Biomed Mater Res A. 2013, 101(12): 3511-3519
    6. KA Amoako, Archangeli C, Major TC, Meyerhoff ME, Annich GM, Bartlett RH. Thromboresistance Characterization of Extruded Nitric Oxide Releasing Silicone Catheters ASAIO Journal2012; 58: 238 -246
    7. Major TC, Brant DO, Burney CP, KAAmoako, Annich GM, Meyerhoff ME, Handa H, and Bartlett RH. The hemocompatibility of a nitric oxide generating polymer that catalyzes S-nitrosothiol decomposition in an extracorporeal circulation model. Biomaterials2011; 32: 5957e5969
    8. KA Amoako, Cook KE. Nitric oxide-generating silicone as a blood-contacting biomaterial. ASAIO Journal2011; 57:539–544
    9. D. Pokrajac, KAAmoako, Patel H, Brooks J, Cenat N, Marcus K, Darden S. Data Mining in Geosciences. TELSIKS 2003; 534-537 

    TEACHING INTERESTS

    Dr. Amoako’s teaching interests are in Biomaterials and Design and Application of Biomaterials in Medicine. His teaching philosophy include providing the connection between learning material and the “big picture”, treating students with respect, diversifying teaching methods to accommodate both visual and auditory learners, using assessment tools to evaluate teaching methods, and having plans for growth as an educator.

    RESEARCH INTERESTS

    Dr. Amoako’s research focuses on bio-inspired polymer surface and bulk modification to incorporate anti-clotting functions of the endothelium on biomaterials. His research goal is to address cardiovascular diseases through medical device development. He has worked on medical device fabrication, surface modification, and in vivo testing.  Examples of blood contacting devices that he has studied, using animal test models, include artificial lungs and catheters.