Parameters for image-map-2:{}
University of New Haven logo
ronlinder
Ron Linder '91
Chief Executive Officer, Elad Software Systems

Creating Smart Solutions

If the next ten years of Ron Linder’s career are anything like the first, the sky’s the limit.

Since graduating from UNH in 1991, Linder has risen rapidly up the corporate ladder and is now CEO of Elad Software Systems, an Israeli IT services provider specializing in healthcare solutions and computerized medical records. Elad, part of the Elad Group, currently employs about 700 people and operates two software development centers in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem.

Growing up in Givataym, a small suburb of Tel Aviv, Linder was involved in everything. From sports to social events, he was always finding ways to engage himself and others.

While studying industrial engineering at Tel Aviv University, he was drawn to the idea of gaining some real-world experience and, in particular, learning more about U.S. culture and education.

After reviewing several exchange programs, Linder knew UNH was the right fit for him.

“I was looking for a program in order to get some international experience,” Linder recalls. “The opportunity at UNH was perfect for me: small university, great interaction with the professors, many international students and a great location.”

Settling into college can be difficult for anyone, but settling into a whole new country can be downright daunting. Linder took the transition in stride with a little help from a friend – Ira Kleinfeld, associate provost for graduate studies, research and faculty development, who helped him land a job at a local Subway plant working on production enhancements.

“The idea was to practice manufacturing measurements in order to improve the production lines’ productivity,” Linder says. “This was a great opportunity to experience the local business culture and implement the industrial methods we learned at school.”

Linder decided to stay at UNH to finish his bachelor’s degree and went on to earn an MBA from Bar Ilan University in Israel. These days, Linder’s work at Elad focuses on mobile health.

“We want to externalize medical information from the electronic medical record application to the physicians’ smartphones,” he says. “At the end of the process, physicians will be able to view their patients’ medical information securely via their smartphones after they leave the hospital and, if needed, to interact with the medical staff.”

The intent is to improve the medical services provided to patients and to ensure that, in emergencies, medical staff will be able to interact and consult with experts regardless of their location.

Always on the hunt to turn a great concept into a successful business, Linder hopes to be running his own tech company in the coming years.

With his track record so far, who would bet against him?