University Response to COVID-19

Out of an abundance of caution, the University is taking action to prevent the spread of COVID-19 (coronavirus). This page will be used to provide updates to the University Community.

Updated: June 3, 2020

Updated to include an email from President Kaplan announcing fall 2020 academic calendar changes.

Jump to resources available on this page:

Important Notifications

Frequently Asked Questions

Also in this section of the website:

Plan for Return to Campus

Important Notifications
  • Wednesday, June 3: Email from President Kaplan Announcing Academic Calendar Changes for Fall 2020

    Dear Members of the University Community,

    I write with an update to our academic calendar and with some specific information regarding the fall 2020 semester.

    As I announced last week, we will begin the process of welcoming students into the residence halls on August 24. In order to engage students immediately, we will hold online classes during the week of August 24, and then begin in-person instruction on August 31. Please note that faculty will be as flexible as possible during this first week, understanding that resident students will need to dedicate some time to moving into their residence halls.

    Here is the planned calendar for the fall, which can also be viewed here:

    • August 24 – Online Instruction Begins (flexible attendance)
    • August 24, 25, and morning of August 26 – New Student Move-in
    • August 26 (afternoon), 27, and 28 – Returning Student Move-in
    • August 31 – On-ground Instruction Begins
    • September 7 (Labor Day) – Classes Meet
    • October 12-13 (Fall Break) – Classes Meet
    • November 25 – Residence Halls Close at 12 p.m.
    • November 25-December 1 – Thanksgiving Break
    • December 7-8 – Reading Days
    • December 9-15 – Final Exams

    You will see that we have made the decision to conclude fall semester, in-person classes on Tuesday, November 24, when students will leave campus for the Thanksgiving holiday. Students will not return to campus following Thanksgiving, but will finish their semester coursework and final exams online from home.

    For students participating in fall 2020 mini-terms, those terms will operate as they would have previously. The last two weeks of mini-term 2 will take place online.

    This schedule will allow students to meet the requirements for contact hours for the semester. Because we are asking students to remain home after Thanksgiving, we will adjust charges for room and meal plan costs for the term. These new rates will be published early next week on the Bursar’s Office website and will appear on your fall semester bill that will be available in ePay on June 12.

    In addition to the time away from campus, the adjustment will factor in new costs we are incurring such as frequent COVID-19-related cleanings of residence halls, classrooms, and dining facilities, as well as personal protective equipment purchases and other health and safety provisions.

    Reimagining Learning and Community

    The decisions we have made are based on the comprehensive work of our COVID-19 Task Forces. The schedule discussed above and below is created in concert with a process outlined by the state of Connecticut, and in accordance with local, state, and federal health and safety regulations.

    As I have said many times during the past few months, nothing is more important than the well-being of our students, faculty, and staff, and all decisions are being made with that priority in mind. I am fully confident that we will provide a campus environment that meets or exceeds the highest health and safety standards.

    As we reimagine learning and community in our "new normal," the reality is that students will be taught in a flexible combination of in-person and online formats. Our responsibility is to ensure that online experiences achieve the highest degree of interactivity and personal attention. Work being done this spring and summer with some of the best online delivery specialists in the country is designed to achieve that. All faculty are currently being trained to become experts at being able to flex between in-person and online delivery of coursework.

    My sincere belief is that value is determined by return on investment. The return on investment for University of New Haven students, as measured by the incredibly high job placement rates and competitive compensation that our students earn, will, we are confident, remain the same whether our programs are delivered online, on the ground, or through a combination of both.

    Please note that all schedules are tentative and may change, depending on the course of the coronavirus and are subject to decisions made by the state of Connecticut and local health authorities.

    Rigorous measures will be in place to maintain the health and safety of all members of our University community as we plan for the schedule that has been outlined. You will hear more about these plans and others regarding course schedules, the move-in schedule, and lab work, among other questions you undoubtedly will have, from our COVID-19 Task Forces in the coming days. We are excited to welcome our students back to campus. In the meantime, I wish you a safe and healthy start to summer.

    With best wishes,


    Steven H. Kaplan, Ph.D.
    President

  • Tuesday, May 26: Email from the Deputy Provost and University Registrar Regarding Pass/Fail Option for Summer Courses

    Dear Students,

    The opportunity to elect a Pass/Fail grade will be available for all summer courses. Deadlines for each term, and directions on how to access the election form are below, but please read through this message for important information on what to consider when choosing a Pass/Fail grade.

    PLEASE NOTE: Students for whom any of the courses on this worksheet are prerequisites to other courses should consult with their advisors before they choose Pass/Fail for those courses. Be aware that even if you choose the Pass/Fail option for any of these courses, that is what will be recorded on your transcript, however, your actual letter grade might be used to determine whether you are eligible to take the next course (any course for which this course is a prerequisite). If the minimum grade is not met, you may need to repeat the course. Again, if you are unsure about what the next course will be, please check with your advisor.

    For courses where students choose the Pass/Fail option, regardless of the grade that would have been earned during the term, the student will be assigned either a Pass (P) or Fail (U). Pass will be earned when the grade would ordinarily have been between A and D- (undergraduate courses) or A and C- (graduate courses), while Fail will be earned if the student’s grade is below D- (undergraduate) or C- (graduate).

    A Pass (P) will count as having successfully completed the course for purposes of academic progress, and the student will receive course credit, but no quality points will be earned, meaning it will not affect the student’s GPA either positively or negatively. A Fail (U) will not count as having successfully completed the course, meaning no course credit will be received, but likewise will not affect the student’s GPA.

    While transcripts will only show "P" or "U", the A-F grade information will remain available to the registrar. This information can be used to determine if students have met prerequisite requirements. A student who does not meet the prerequisite may have to repeat the class to meet the requirement. For example, a student who received a "P" in a Calculus I class and whose letter grade was a D, will receive a "P" for the class but might have to repeat the course before being allowed to register for Calculus II.

    The Pass/Fail Grade Election form is available in myCharger. From the One Stop Student Financial and Registrar Services page, choose Registrar Forms. The form is located in the Registration and Courses section.

    Submission deadlines:

    • Full Summer courses – Wednesday, August 5th
    • Summer Session I courses – Wednesday, June 24th
    • Summer Session II courses – Thursday, August 6th

    Please let us know if you have any questions.

    Best,

    Glenn McGee, Deputy Provost
    Beth Rezendes, University Registrar

  • Wednesday, May 20: Email from President Kaplan about Phased Plan for Return to Campus

    Dear Students,

    As the state of Connecticut begins a gradual reopening of the economy today, the University is announcing its own plans for a three-phased reopening of the campus. As always, the health and safety of all members of our community remain our top priority.

    We are reimagining life at the University and will begin to welcome you back to campus on August 24.

    PHASED PLAN FOR RETURN TO CAMPUS

    • June 1 – Select labs and research can resume on campus and in field
    • July 6 – On-campus pilot with identified groups of residential students, faculty, and staff
    • August 24 – Plan for residential students to begin to return to campus.

    All dates provided here are tentative and subject to approval by the state of Connecticut provided that certain public health and safety conditions are met. In the event developments with the virus change, we are continuing with contingency planning for all eventualities that will include dramatically enriched online learning opportunities to ensure that, whenever necessary, we can transition seamlessly between on-campus and online learning.

    Please visit this page for details about health and safety measures and guidelines associated with the reopening plans.

    Thank you in advance for your enthusiasm – and your cooperation – as we continue to plan a safe and rewarding return to campus.

    With best wishes,


    Steven H. Kaplan, Ph.D.
    President

  • Friday, May 15: Email Announcing Virtual and In-Person Commencement Dates

    Dear Class of 2020,

    We are pleased to share that dates for a virtual Commencement celebration and an in-person Commencement ceremony have been set.

    A virtual celebration will be held on Saturday, July 25, and an in-person ceremony has been scheduled for Sunday, December 13, at the Oakdale Theater in nearby Wallingford, Connecticut. (We should emphasize that the Commencement ceremony for the Class of 2020 will be separate from the Winter 2020 Commencement that is scheduled to be held on a different date in December.)

    At this time, the priority of the Commencement Committee is ensuring all graduates receive their regalia – including caps, gowns, tassels, hoods for graduate students, and Latin honor cords – in advance of the virtual ceremony.

    Next week, you will receive an email from the Commencement Committee with details on how you can order your regalia. You will also receive an email next week from GradImages – the partner we are working with to create our virtual celebration – with information about how you can submit a photo to be featured part of the program.

    Like you, we are disappointed that we will not be able to gather this weekend for a traditional Commencement ceremony. We are committed, though, to hosting a virtual celebration that is befitting of all you have achieved and to gathering when it is safe to honor you and your limitless potential.

    Please know how proud we are of each of you and, particularly, the resolve you have shown during your final semester. We know this was a challenging experience, but you should take great pride in how you have responded to the adversity you have faced.

    The entire University community will be thinking of you on Sunday. We look forward to celebrating you during our virtual program in July and coming together with you in December to host a celebration that you richly deserve. Until then, we offer you our best wishes in all of your future endeavors.

    Sincerely,

    Mario Gaboury, J.D., Ph.D.
    Interim Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs

    Rebecca Johnson, M.A.
    Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students

  • Friday, May 15: Email About Spring 2020 Residential Student Move Out

    Dear Resident Students,

    We have finalized the details of a program that will enable you to return to campus to retrieve your personal belongings and move out of the residence halls. Two-hour time slots will be available on May 27 and 28 and June 4 to 6.

    Beginning on Monday, students will have an opportunity to register for a timeslot via myHousing. Students will be permitted in shifts, based on their residence hall, to register for a timeslot. Students will receive a separate email from the Office of Residential Life with details about when they can register for a move-out time slot.

    Please be aware that, at this time, the campus remains closed to those who have not received prior authorization to be on campus. Resident students will only have access to their residence hall rooms during the time they signed up for through myHousing.

    Similar to the voluntary move-out program that was conducted in March, there are many public health requirements in place that will be strictly enforced by the West Haven Public Health Department.

    • All individuals on campus and in the residence halls are required to wear a mask, per state mandate.
    • Students will have a two-hour window to pack up and remove their belongings. This time limit has been put in place per orders of local health officials. Students should come prepared to pack and leave campus quickly. It is recommended that you bring whatever you need to move your belongings i.e. handcarts, boxes, storage tubs, etc.
    • Per order of the local health department, only 20 people will be allowed in a residence hall building at one time. As a result, there is a chance that not everyone in the same time slot will be permitted to enter a building at the same time. We will, to the best of our ability, provide that everyone has ample time to collect and remove their items. We thank you in advance for your patience and flexibility.
    • Students will be allowed to bring multiple cars to campus and multiple people with them. Per health mandates and social distancing guidelines, it is imperative, though, that only the student and one other individual will be allowed in the building.
    • Porters will be stationed at each of the residence hall elevators to wipe down the interior of the elevators and all buttons after each use.
    • Bins that are typically available during traditional move-in days will not be available because of the health and safety concerns of people reusing the bins.
    • Please note that the Office of Facilities needed to discard any perishable items that were left in refrigerators for health and safety purposes.

    Understand that this process could change or be cancelled at any time by the West Haven Public Health Department due to the fluidity of the situation or if individuals are found to not be abiding by the regulations that are in place.

    The University has been following all Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidance for the cleaning and disinfecting of all buildings throughout the campus. During this move-our program, facilities personnel will be diligent about cleaning and sanitizing common areas. All rooms in which personal belongings remain have been locked and secured since students left campus in March.

    Individuals who are not comfortable coming to campus or who are unable to come to campus at this time should email ResLife@newhaven.edu. Any items not removed by the conclusion of the last time slot for your residence hall will be packed and placed in storage to enable the Office of Facilities to perform a deep cleaning and sanitizing of all residence hall rooms. I want to offer my heartfelt congratulations to those who are graduating and thank all of you for your patience and understanding during this unprecedented time.

    Sincerely,

    Rebecca Johnson
    Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students

  • Wednesday, May 13: Email from President Kaplan about Planning for the Fall

    Dear Members of the University Community,

    Last week, Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont and the Reopen Connecticut Advisory Group’s education committee, of which I am proud to be a member, released details about a planned phased reopening of colleges and universities in Connecticut. The plan, which begins with being able to resume on-campus research programs as early as May 20, culminates with the scheduled reopening later this summer of undergraduate residential institutions, such as ours, should the prevailing health conditions at that time make it possible.

    The sequencing in place is dependent upon several public health conditions and guidelines that must be met, including residential colleges and universities having access to enough COVID-19 tests to test students upon arrival, developing plans for immediately quarantining anyone who tests positive, and ensuring an adequate capacity to conduct contact tracing. I fully support the prudent and deliberate actions the Governor has outlined to protect our well-being while enabling us, should conditions permit, to safely return to offering an on-campus educational experience for our students.

    In order to reopen, we will be required to file re-opening plans with the Connecticut Department of Health that must detail a phased re-population of campus, how we will monitor health conditions to detect infection and contain the spread of the disease if detected, and an implementation plan for temporarily ceasing on-campus operations and transitioning to online learning, in the event it becomes necessary.

    Based on the Governor’s latest guidance, we are hopeful and cautiously optimistic that we can welcome students to campus in late summer, and we are actively planning for that scenario, while we also continue contingency planning for any and all eventualities we might encounter as a result of this continually evolving situation.

    Our work with leading national experts on creating a parallel university is empowering us to foster the same immersive educational experiences and engaging co-curricular activities both in-person and online and will enable us, when necessary, to transition seamlessly between delivery methods. This approach will be both groundbreaking and critical to the long-term success of the University and our students.

    My priority since the start of this unprecedented crisis has been ensuring the safety of all of our students. That is, and will always remain, my main concern. As I have previously indicated, I have asked Summer McGee, Ph.D., the dean of our School of Health Sciences who has become a sought-after national expert throughout the pandemic, and Ron Quagliani, associate vice president of public safety and a former police chief, to co-chair a University working group that is ensuring we have policies and procedures in place for when we resume campus operations regarding testing, contact tracing, and quarantining in the event members of our University community contract COVID-19.

    This group has been actively working to create policies to adhere to current social distancing practices in all of our operations, and ensuring that we have an adequate supply of tests and personal protective equipment for our community members and a plan for contact tracing.

    As we plan to open the campus later this summer, we are redoubling our commitment to continuing to provide a world-class educational experience in and out of the classroom that equips all of our students with the knowledge and experience they need to reach the ambitious goals they have set for themselves.

    I expect that once we are able to come together again as a University community, we will face some changes in campus operations and how we interact with one another. I would ask that you continue to illustrate the patience and understanding you have shown since this situation began.

    Admittedly, there are many questions that, right now, we do not have answers to, such as how the new normal we are living in will impact staples of the college experience including campus life, student organizations, study abroad, and intercollegiate athletics. We will be creative and innovative in fostering the immersive and engaging educational experience in and out of the classroom that we are known for and that our students richly deserve.

    I recognize that this has been a trying and challenging time for us all. I continue to be inspired by the frontline healthcare workers and the emergency responders – many of whom are currently living on our campus – who so selflessly devote themselves to their life-saving responsibilities.

    Personally, this has truly been one of the most trying experiences of my four decades as an educator. I feel for our students, particularly our seniors and those currently in the process of concluding their graduate studies. I know this is not how you envisioned concluding your current academic pursuits at the University. I am confident, though, that the resolve you have shown as well as the ability you developed to adapt to and overcome challenges will serve you well in all of your future endeavors.

    My ultimate goal is to be able to welcome everyone back to campus later this summer to resume the rewarding in-person educational experiences we have a rich history of creating for generations of students over the last 100 years. My commitment to you – and your families – though is that we will only return to campus once it is safe and when all necessary measures are in place to ensure we are able to appropriately respond to any situation we could face as a result of this ever-evolving pandemic.

    As we continue to plan to re-open our campus, I assure you that we will be ready for all eventualities we may face as a result of the coronavirus global pandemic and, most importantly, that we will be prepared to continue to provide our students exemplary learning opportunities either on-campus, online or through a combination of both delivery methods.

    Writing in the Wall Street Journal earlier this week, Harvard Physics Professor Eric Mazur and Bob Kerrey, former Nebraska Governor, U.S. senator and president of New York's New School, said, "Higher-education leaders should seize this period of upheaval as an opportunity to focus on learning, shift to student-centered instruction, and look for new opportunities the online setup affords. The move to virtual classrooms is a chance for institutions at every level to make learning more effective—off campus or on. It is an opportunity to refocus on student outcomes, on the development of universal skills that will enable graduates to respond to the next crisis, to create resilience and adapt to unfamiliar territory, and to help lead society forward."

    In the many discussions I have with my senior leaders and faculty and staff across the University, I have emphasized that it is incumbent on all of us to ensure that we learn something from this experience. I am confident that as University community we all have.

    I thank you for your continued confidence and trust as we navigate this situation and position ourselves to emerge from this crisis stronger than ever.

    With best wishes,


    Steven H. Kaplan, Ph.D.
    President

  • Tuesday, May 12: Email from President Kaplan to the Class of 2020

    Dear Class of 2020,

    This Sunday marks a momentous occasion: the pre-pandemic date for your Spring 2020 Commencement and the celebration of the graduating class of the University of New Haven’s Centennial year.

    Although, like you, I am disappointed that we will not be able to gather in person, I want to take this opportunity to share how proud I am of each and every one of you. I think it is important to recognize you not only for all you have accomplished on your educational journey at the University, but also for the incredible resilience you have shown during this difficult time.

    I feel privileged to have served as University President in support of students like you — individuals capable of great dignity, resolve, and determination. As I have often said, I believe that members of the Class of 2020 have limitless potential. It is my hope that you see within yourselves the same qualities I see in you — enduring faith in your individual and collective strength and the confidence that you and your peers will emerge from this unprecedented crisis with an even greater sense of community and purpose as you take your next steps in the world.

    We are still planning a virtual celebration to take place in June, and our planning committee is working diligently to ensure this is an event worthy of you and this special time in your lives. As I have indicated in the past, this event is not intended to be a replacement for our in-person ceremony. I still have every expectation that the University will host an in-person Commencement at a time when it is safe for all of us to gather again. We are currently anticipating this will happen in December 2020 and will provide updates once we know more.

    I should note that when we decided in March to postpone rather than cancel Commencement, we did so with the understanding that this was your — and my — top priority. We had planned to provide you with caps and gowns at that time for the in-person ceremony. In truth, we did not anticipate your strong desire to have those items available to you either for your own recognition of the original May 17 date or for the virtual ceremony. We’ve heard you loud and clear, and we are making every effort to provide caps and gowns in advance of the virtual ceremony in June.

    Thank you again for your patience and understanding. What gives me great optimism is that — like the nearly 100 classes that graduated before you — the Class of 2020 is equipped with the skills and knowledge to address the issues that confront us and the challenges we, as a society, will face, not only in the immediate future, but also in the years to come.

    With best wishes,


    Steven H. Kaplan, Ph.D.
    President

Frequently Asked Questions
    General
  • What steps has the University taken to communicate with students, faculty, and staff?

    The University community is being updated on a regular basis via email, and this webpage. All major communications are archived in the Important Notifications section of this webpage. Frequently Asked Questions are being added to this page, as necessary.

  • Academics
  • Are summer courses being offered online?

    The University has made the decision to offer an expanded slate of Summer 2020 courses. Courses available include undergraduate core courses, major courses, electives and graduate courses as well. Due to the unfolding situation with COVID-19, all Summer 2020 courses will be offered in an online and/or distance learning format. For more information, please read the email from Thursday, April 9, which is archived on this page under "Important Notifications."

  • What emergency academic policy changes have been put into place because of COVID-19?

    COVID-19 EMERGENCY ACADEMIC POLICY CHANGES - Summary (provided by the Office of the Provost)

    CHANGES TO TRADITIONAL (A-F) GRADING: The A-F system is the default, i.e., unless a student chooses the Pass/Fail system outlined below. If a student's grade at the end of the term dictates that they would ordinarily receive a grade of F, they will instead receive a "U," which will not count against GPA but also does not count as satisfactory completion of the course, meaning no course credit will be given.

    PASS/FAIL OPTION: Students may choose this option for a single course, multiple courses, all courses, or no courses taken during this period. For each course taken during the period in which this policy is in effect, students will receive a letter grade unless they elect to switch to Pass/Fail grading for that course. Students wishing to choose the Pass/Fail option for a course should notify the Registrar (through a system to be announced) prior to May 5, 2020.

    For courses where students choose the Pass/Fail option, regardless of the grade that would have been earned during the term, the student will be assigned either a Pass (P) or Fail (U). Pass will be earned when the grade would ordinarily have been between A and D- (undergraduate courses) or A and C- (graduate courses), while Fail will be earned if the student’s grade is below D- (undergraduate) or C- (graduate). A Pass will count as having successfully completed the course for purposes of academic progress, and the student will receive course credit, but no quality points will be earned, meaning it will not affect the student’s GPA either positively or negatively. A Fail (U) will not count as having successfully completed the course, meaning no course credit will be received, but likewise will not affect the student’s GPA.

    Please note that while a Pass/Fail grade is what will be recorded on the transcript, the traditional letter grade will also be retained for course prerequisite purposes. If you are in a program that requires licensure or certification this may be relevant, and students should consult with their advisors, and, if applicable, with Athletics, Financial Aid, and/or International Student Office before selecting to go to Pass/Fail for courses. All students should check with their advisors about the advisability of the Pass/Fail option.

    ACADEMIC STANDING: Students currently on academic probation of any kind will not be penalized based on their grades during this period.

    MID-TERM GRADING: Midterm grades for Spring 2020 are due by April 15, 2020 and faculty are asked to submit grades by this date so that students will be aware of their current standing. However the system will allow faculty to submit midterm grades as late as necessary.

    REPEAT POLICY: All limits contained in the policy regarding repeating courses are suspended for courses taken during this period.

    WITHDRAWAL (W) POLICY: Students may elect to withdraw from a course until May 5, 2020.

    INCOMPLETE (INC and INC+) POLICY: Incomplete grades (INC or INC+) earned during this period will not be converted into failing grades under any circumstances. If the remaining work toward an INC is completed within one academic year, it will be converted to either a letter grade (A-D-) or a Pass grade, but if the work is not completed, it will remain an Incomplete. Policies regarding requesting extensions to make up the INC+ grade remain in place.

    COMPLETION OF EXISTING INCOMPLETE (INC and INC+) COURSES: Students who already have an Incomplete grade (INC or INC+) with work pending will not have such courses converted to failing grades, and will have such reasonable amount of additional time as necessary to complete the work still outstanding.

    THIS POLICY IS SUBJECT TO UPDATES AND TECHNICAL CORRECTIONS

  • How will online delivery of classes affect graduation status and progress toward degree?

    The University is committed to developing alternative course delivery that will allow our students to continue their coursework. Academic program leaders are reviewing the situation now and developing these plans, which will be communicated to students by their instructors. A priority is being placed on students who are anticipating graduating in May. The University will provide the necessary resources and support to the extent possible to enable students to meet their academic goals, and if insurmountable difficulties present themselves, we will work with students to find the best available solutions or appropriate alternatives.

  • How can I contact the Office of Information Technology (OIT) to let them know that I do not have a working computer or internet connection?
  • What resources are available for students in need of Internet access?

    Any student in need of internet service is encouraged to reach out to Comcast (call 1-855-846-8376) or Charter Communications (call 1-844-488-8395) to see how they can receive 60 days of internet service for free.

  • Commencement
  • Has Spring 2020 Commencement been postponed?

    Due to the ongoing impact of the coronavirus global pandemic and local and federal health mandates, Spring 2020 Commencement has been postponed. We will hold an in-person ceremony when it is safe. In addition to the in-person ceremony, we are also moving forward with plans to hold a virtual celebration.

    For a full FAQ about Spring 2020 Commencement, please click here.

  • Financial
  • What programs are available for students who have been impacted financially? Updated June 1

    The Chargers Helping Chargers Fund was established and provided with significant funding from several members of the University’s Board of Governors, as well as from faculty, staff, and alumni to help support current students seeking assistance for such necessities as housing, food, medical expenses, remote learning or instructional technology, or other emergency needs. Students can learn more by visiting myCharger. Due to an overwhelming response to this program, the Chargers Helping Chargers Fund is no longer accepting applications at this time. Should additional funding become available, we will review applications in the order in which they were received until all available funds have been provided to our students.

  • Did the University receive any funding through the CARES Act passed by Congress?

    Through the CARES act, the federal government has provided the University $4.6 million in funding. The CARES Act stipulates that 50 percent of these funds be distributed directly to students. We will be using these funds to provide assistance to our students and their families who are facing the most significant financial challenges as a result of the coronavirus global pandemic. The University plans to use the remaining $2.3 million to help offset expenses associated with the transition to distance learning.

  • How and when will CARES funding be provided to students? Updated May 22

    Students receiving CARES Act funding received an email at their University email address on May 22. Due to the limited funds available, not all students will receive CARES funding. For more information about the CARES Act and how the distribution of funds was determined, please click here.

  • Will students be refunded for the portion of housing and meals they were unable to utilize? Updated April 17

    During President Kaplan’s virtual meeting with students on April 16, it was announced that partial credits for spring room and board charges will be posted to students’ accounts by the end of April. Students expecting a credit will be able to see this reflected in ePay by April 30. As was previously announced, students returning to the University will be able to use this credit toward current or future University charges. Returning students who lived on campus and/or who had a meal plan during the spring semester, will be eligible for a credit that can be applied toward current or future University charges.

    Students who are graduating in May and students who ultimately do not return to the University in the fall will be eligible to receive a refund, should an overpayment exist on their student account. Refunds for graduating seniors will be issued starting in early May, and this process is expected to take two weeks. Refunds for students not returning to the University will be processed continually, starting in June, and will be processed as the University becomes aware of a student’s future plans. Refunds will be processed through the Bursar’s Office and will follow standard refunding protocol. Students who are signed up for direct deposit will receive their refund in that manner. Students who are not signed up for direct deposit, and elect not to sign up, will have a check mailed to their home address.

    Students who studied at the University’s Tuscany campus this spring will receive credits or refunds as outlined above.

  • Is the University crediting any other charges besides housing and meals? Updated May 11

    The University has reviewed all spring charges and has recently posted credits to students' accounts. Students should review their account in ePay should they have questions as to whether or not they received a credit.

    As with housing and meal credits, students who are graduating in May and students who ultimately do not return to the University in the fall will be eligible to receive a refund, should an overpayment exist on their student account. Refunds for graduating seniors will be issued starting in early May, and this process is expected to take two weeks. Refunds for students not returning to the University will be processed continually, starting in June, and will be processed as the University becomes aware of a student’s future plans. Refunds will be processed through the Bursar's Office and will follow standard refunding protocol. Students who are signed up for direct deposit will receive their refund in that manner. Students who are not signed up for direct deposit, and elect not to sign up, will have a check mailed to their home address.

  • International Students
  • What guidance does the University have for international students?

    The International Students Office is available to assist international students.

    Normally, F-1 visa regulations limit online study to a maximum of one course (3 credits) per term. However, SEVP has given us some special dispensations in order to deal with University adaptations due to the COVID-19 virus.

    Our advice to all international students right now is to stay calm, follow all health advisories and health best practices, continue your studies, and be in regular contact with your professors regarding completing coursework online.

    Also, students who are finishing coursework in May 2020 and are applying for OPT, would not qualify for OPT if they leave the country. We would thus recommend that students applying for OPT continue their application process, but stay in the U.S. to finish their courses.

  • Personal Health
  • Who should I contact with a health-related question or concern?

    In addition to contacting your primary care physician, individuals with health-related questions can contact the University’s Department of Health Services by calling (203) 932-7079 from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. After hours, individuals can call (203) 815-9877 to speak with a nurse on call. Should you need to leave a message, the on-call nurse will return you call. At this time it is important for members of the University’s Health Services staff to actually speak with those who have health-related questions, enabling the staff member to accurately assess any issue and provide a personalized response beyond what can be done via email.

    Students who have symptoms of a fever, cough, shortness of breath, or sore throat should self-isolate and seek medical care ASAP for evaluation and testing. Individuals are advised to call their primary care physician or local urgent care center before visiting the doctor’s office. Students should also complete the University’s online illness notification www.newhaven.edu/illnessnotification.

  • Residential Life and Campus Services
  • When can students move out of the residence halls and retrieve their belongings?

    Since the decision was made to continue remote learning for the rest of the semester, one of the most common questions we have received is when students would be able to retrieve these items. The University worked with local health officials to create a plan that follows all current local health guidelines about social distancing and limiting the number of people in one place. In order to facilitate an orderly process and follow the guidance of federal and state officials, we have scheduled residence hall-specific, 2-hour time blocks from Friday, March 20 – Wednesday, March 25, for students to access their room or apartment for the purpose of removing belongings.

    This is not mandatory and it is a completely voluntary option for resident students who have expressed an interest in picking up either essential items or all of their belongings at this time. Understand that this process could change or be cancelled at any time due to the fluidity of the situation or individuals not abiding by the regulations. Students who are symptomatic and/or coming from an area under isolation, should not come to campus. Students who are in that category, are unable to get to campus at all, or are unable to get to campus at their assigned date and time, will have their belongings secured in their room until you are able to return to campus on a future date to be determined.

  • What about residential students that are currently living on campus?

    International students who are unable to return to their homes and have no other living options will continue to be accommodated in University housing. They should contact reslife@newhaven.edu.

    Other students with extenuating circumstances that prohibit them from leaving campus should contact us at reslife@newhaven.edu. Extenuating circumstances DO NOT include employment or internship issues.

  • Will students be refunded for the portion of housing and meals they were unable to utilize? Updated April 17

    During President Kaplan’s virtual meeting with students on April 16, it was announced that partial credits for spring room and board charges will be posted to students’ accounts by the end of April. Students expecting a credit will be able to see this reflected in ePay by April 30. As was previously announced, students returning to the University will be able to use this credit toward current or future University charges. Returning students who lived on campus and/or who had a meal plan during the spring semester, will be eligible for a credit that can be applied toward current or future University charges.

    Students who are graduating in May and students who ultimately do not return to the University in the fall will be eligible to receive a refund, should an overpayment exist on their student account. Refunds for graduating seniors will be issued starting in early May, and this process is expected to take two weeks. Refunds for students not returning to the University will be processed continually, starting in June, and will be processed as the University becomes aware of a student’s future plans. Refunds will be processed through the Bursar’s Office and will follow standard refunding protocol. Students who are signed up for direct deposit will receive their refund in that manner. Students who are not signed up for direct deposit, and elect not to sign up, will have a check mailed to their home address.

    Students who studied at the University’s Tuscany campus this spring will receive credits or refunds as outlined above.

  • What will happen with mail or packages that are being sent to campus? Updated May 4

    The mailroom will be operating on a limited and part-time basis through at least June 30 and is only accepting mail that facilitates critical departmental needs. Faculty and staff with critical needs should coordinate with the University postmaster.

    The only student mail being accepted at this time is mail addressed to the limited number of students who, due to extenuating circumstances, still reside in University housing. Student packages that were received prior to March 20 were made available to students who participated in the residence hall move-out that occurred in March. Packages that were not picked up at that time remain secured on campus.

  • How can students return textbooks that were rented from the Campus Store? Updated May 4

    Students received an email recently with guidance about returning rental textbooks.

    For students who have the textbooks in their possession, after final exams are complete, please follow the instructions in the email they received to print a pre-paid shipping label and return the rental textbooks as soon as possible.

    For students whose rental textbooks are unable to be returned because their books are in their residence hall and are not retrievable at this time, the current policy is to delay charges until June 30. We will provide further guidance once it is determined when students will be able to access their residence halls.

    Finally, we are aware that some students already tried to return their books to campus and it was returned to sender because the University's mailroom was temporarily closed at the start of the pandemic. If this happened to you, the pre-paid shipping label cannot be used again. You can re-ship the books via FedEx Ground and retain the receipt for the shipping costs. Upon return to campus, students should visit the campus store with their shipping receipt, and the campus store will refund the shipping amount.

    If you have any questions, please contact Campus Store manager Laraine Johnson at LJohnson@newhaven.edu.

  • Student Employment
  • Federal Work Study Student Employees: How will my federal work study position be impacted if I am not able to work due to COVID-19?

    At this time, the federal government will provide funding for all federal work study positions, even if student employees are not able to work due to COVID-19. Federal work study student employees will be paid based upon their weekly scheduled hours, as determined by the supervisor and the student at the beginning of their employment during the Spring 2020 term. Eligible federal work study student employees should have been awarded work study funds and completed the necessary work authorization and employment paperwork with the Student Employment Office prior to March 10, 2020. If the paperwork was not completed prior to March 10, 2020, the University will not be able to grant the work study award as per federal financial aid regulations.

    The weekly scheduled hours determined by the student and supervisor at the beginning of the Spring 2020 term will be paid from March 23, 2020 – May 13, 2020. Please be aware that your total compensation for this time period cannot exceed your federal work study award.

    In some cases, student employees may be able to perform their work remotely based on specific arrangements with their supervisors. Federal work study student employees approved to work remotely during this time will be paid the greater of either the hours they work or the weekly scheduled hours determined by the supervisor and the student at the beginning of their employment during the Spring 2020 term. If students and supervisors determine they are no longer able to perform work remotely, this will not affect their federal work study award based on the predetermined schedule and number of hours set with their supervisors.

    Student employees should be on the lookout for emails from the Payroll Office containing important information about their pay.

  • Summer Youth Academies
  • Will the University hold its Summer Youth Academies?

    The University has decided to cancel its 2020 Summer Academies. All payments will be refunded. We apologize for any disappointment, and we hope you will decide to join us again in Summer 2021. Visit our Summer Youth Academies page for more information.

  • Travel & Study Abroad
  • What guidelines does the University have in place for personal travel?

    The University is continuing to advise against non-essential personal travel. Students who do decide to travel to countries where the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has instituted level 2 or level 3 warnings advising against nonessential travel – including Italy, China, South Korea, Iran, and Japan – must self-report to the Health Services Office at (203) 932-7079 and refrain from coming to the West Haven or Orange campuses for 14 days after their arrival back in the United States.

    On March 8, the U.S. State Department issued an advisory warning U.S. travelers against cruise travel. View the CDC’s advice for travelers..

  • At this time, is University-sponsored travel continuing?

    As of March 9, the University has cancelled all University-sponsored travel until further notice.

  • What about students who were studying at the Tuscany campus in Spring 2020 and returned to the U.S.?

    A full list of messages, information, and FAQ specific to the students who were studying in Prato in spring 2020 can be found on this Tuscany-specific page.

  • What is the status of study abroad programs scheduled for summer and fall 2020, and should students continue to apply/deposit for them?

    No decision has been made to cancel any study abroad programming in the summer 2020 or fall 2020 terms. Students interested in these programs should continue to submit application materials, deposits, and down payments. If summer 2020 and/or fall 2020 programs are cancelled by the University, students will receive a full refund or credit to their account. If a program is not cancelled by the University, but a student doesn't feel comfortable going and wants to withdraw, they can do so before the program's withdrawal deadline. No refund will be issued for non-cancelled programs after the program's withdrawal deadline, as the University will have secured tickets, accommodations, etc. For specific questions about summer and fall study abroad programming, please contact the Office of Study Abroad at studyabroad@newhaven.edu.